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Buckner & Garcia “Pac-Man Fever” (1982)

It all started with the video junkie smash single, “Pac-Man Fever,” probably the most stirring celebration of hitting rock bottom since the Velvet Underground’s “Heroin,” and blossomed into this full length cash in. You can take Pac-Man Fever as mere novelty, or read between the 8-bit lines for the real story. Check out the chilling “to a Centipede,” as the protagonist’s emotionless voice warns “don’t try hiding behind the mushrooms… I see you” like a calculating serial-killer, the shell-shocked pilot in a kill or be killed battle at the heart of “Defender,” or last humanoid on Earth “Goin’ Berzerk” as an ever-increasing wave of robots and Evil Otto close in. All the pressure comes to a boil in the complex set of dance floor directives, “Do the Donkey Kong,” one unrelenting amphetamine rush of a track. Pac-Man Fever stands as a one of a kind archive of a long lost age that will never return, as wood-paneled consoles rot in the back of pizza parlors while the youth of today live out their homicidal fantasies at home, their hot-pocket stained faces permanently glued to X-Boxes and Wiis. –Ben

Ananda Shankar “Ananda Shankar And His Music” (1975)

A scorching soundclash that mixes western funk and fusion with traditional Indian music to stunning effect. The result is some of the funkiest and out-there music from the 70’s. Mad sitar playing, buzzing electronic effects and heavy use of percussion and a non-stop groove makes for some great listening. This is cross-cutural music of the highest order that pandered to no fashions and managed to avoid sounding contrived. High on energy and catchy riffs as well as a good insight into more traditional Indian sounds. –Jon

Ravi Shankar’s nephew, Ananda, fuses traditional Indian music with heavy psych-funk creating one of the best “Indo-fusion” albums of all time! –David